Blog

diabetic retinopathy and picture of gummy treat with blue spoon
Diabetes is becoming increasingly prevalent in the American population.  As more people are diagnosed with the disease, more are facing the sight-threatening risk of diabetic retinopathy.  Diabetic retinopathy, which affects the retina, or the light-detecting tissue in the back of the eye, is one of the leading causes of blindness in our country.  Though the disease has the potential to be very dangerous and blinding, proper diagnoses, treatment, and management of diabetic retinopathy significantly reduces the risks of vision loss.  By working with your eye care provider, primary care doctor, and endocrinologist, cases of diabetic retinopathy can be treated, or even prevented.

presbyopia reading glasses
Just like every other part of the body, the eyes go through natural aging changes.  Presbyopia is the term given to the aging process that affects the eye’s focusing system, making objects up close blurry.  Presbyopia affects everyone, and usually begins occurring sometime in your 40’s. While this change in your vision can be unexpected and frustrating, it is important to remember that presbyopia is a painless and normal process.  Luckily, there are many options to help us adapt to presbyopia. Read on to learn more about what causes presbyopia, and how eye care professionals recommend it be treated.
astigmatism glasses contact lenses
The optical system of the eye is responsible for how light focuses on the retina.  If the shape of the eye prevents light from focusing properly, objects may appear blurry or out of focus.  This problem is known as refractive error, and millions of people are affected by it. While there are many misconceptions about it, astigmatism is simply a form of refractive error.  Just like nearsightedness or farsightedness, astigmatism can be easily fixed by glasses or contact lenses. Continue reading to learn more about astigmatism, and to debunk many of the usual misconceptions about this common form of refractive error.  

cataract surgery
Cataracts are one the most common causes of decreased vision.  They occur when the normally clear lens that rests behind the iris, or the colored part of the eye, becomes cloudy with age.  The clouding of this lens is a normal process that occurs with age, and may occur at different rates in different people. Luckily, when cataracts become significant enough to begin affecting vision or activities of daily life, there is a very effective treatment option.  Cataract extraction surgery is one of the most common and routine medical procedures performed in America and can provide significant and nearly immediate visual improvement. If cataracts are affecting your vision or daily life, read on to learn about the option of cataract surgery.
eyelid twitching myokymia
Nearly everyone has experienced a twitching eyelid at some point in their lives.  An eyelid twitch can be an annoying experience, but luckily it is almost always a harmless occurrence and is rarely noticeable to anyone else.  Eyelid twitching, known medically as myokomia, is a spasm of the eyelid muscles and may have several different causes and triggers. Identifying and understanding the cause of your twitching eyelid can help prevent this annoying experience from reoccurring.  Continue reading to learn more about common underlying causes of myokomia and how to avoid future instances of eyelid twitching.
lasik
Refractive surgery options, such as LASIK, are appealing to many people who have been wearing glasses or contact lenses for most of their lives.  It is important to remember that several options for refractive surgery exist, and different factors play a role in which option best suits you and your eyes.  For some people, the desired result can be achieved without undergoing surgery at all. Continue reading for a guide on traditional refractive surgeries, as well as an overview on some other corrective options.

corneal abrasions
Accidents happen.  Even if we are extremely careful and take all the necessary precautions, injuries can still occur; eye injuries are no exception.  From metallic foreign bodies to chemical burns, the front of the eye is particular susceptible to damage during unexpected injuries.  One of the most common forms of injuries to the front of the eye is a scratch to the outermost surface, known as a corneal abrasion. When a corneal abrasion occurs, the epithelium, or the thin protective layer of the cornea, is broken, causing many uncomfortable symptoms.  Luckily, simple corneal abrasions are usually quick and uncomplicated in their resolution. Read on to learn about how to deal with a scratched ocular surface.
flashes and floaters
Have you ever noticed small spots or strings float across your vision, or noticed a flash of light off to the side?  Occasionally we can experience these visual phenomenon as a result of normal changing occurring within the eye. While they can be alarming, annoying, or distracting, they are typically harmless symptoms.  However, in rare occurrences, flashes and floaters may be symptoms of a more serious ocular condition, such as a retinal tear or detachment. The best way to determine whether flashes or floaters are a benign symptom or a sign of a harmful condition is to visit your eye doctor, who can determine whether or not your ocular health is at risk.

eye exams for kids
Children rely heavily on their eyes and vision for learning and development.  That’s why it is important for your child to have comprehensive eye examinations early in life, so you can be sure they are able to properly use their eyes to grow and develop.  Pediatric eye exams can detect whether or not your child needs glasses, determine how well the eyes are working together and how effective the visual system is, and assess if there are any ocular diseases affecting the front or the back of the eye.
Ocular Allergies
The groundhog Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring this year.  And with spring weather, comes spring allergies. Before you know it, flowers will be blooming, grass will be growing, and pollen will fill the air.  For many people, this change of season means itchy red eyes in addition to sneezing and wheezing. If you are one of the millions of Americans who experiences ocular allergies each year, read on to learn how to best prepare yourself this spring, and how to protect your eyes from uncomfortable symptoms.  
systemic disease
The eye is the only place in the body where blood vessels and nerves can be directly and noninvasively observed.  This means each time you go to the eye doctor, they are evaluating important factors about your overall health. An overwhelming number of systemic diseases can have significant effects on the eyes, and these effects can be identified in comprehensive eye exams.  Diseases like high blood pressure and diabetes can wreak havoc on ocular blood vessels if not properly controlled.

contact lenses

Contact lenses are one of the most widely used medical devices in America. As developmental advancements have improved the selection of contact lenses, millions of people have chosen contacts to provide clear vision on a daily basis. In the wake of these advancements that make contact lenses safer, more versatile, and more comfortable, many misconceptions surround this popular corrective option. Today we’re separating the facts about contact lenses from the fiction.